Transfer Efficiency: Influence of the Gel Structure

With its proprietary transfer buffer, the Trans-Blot Turbo system generates very fast transfer even for high molecular weight proteins. However, as indicated previously, the gel composition, i.e. the acrylamide – bis-acrylamide network density, influences the transfer efficiency. A protein can more easily move out of the gel during the transfer if it is located in a portion of gel that has the widest pore structure. As proteins above 150 kD are always located on the first top part of a gel, the most efficient transfer of those large proteins is achieved when using gradient gel with a concentration of 4% of acrylamide – bis-acrylamide at the top of the gel. The transfer efficiency of proteins from an Any kD homogeneous acrylamide gel and a 4-20% gradient gel is illustrated.

Qualitative transfer efficiency comparison of HMW proteins on homogeneous acrylamide % and gradient gel. Precision Plus Protein™ Unstained standard and E. Coli homogenate (20 μg) were run on both Criterion TGX Any kD Stain-Free and 4-20% gels at 300V for 18 min. The total protein content was detected with the Stain-Free technology using the Gel-Doc EZ imaging system. The gels were then transferred with the Trans-Blot Turbo system with the 7 min preset program using the Trans-Blot Turbo PVDF transfer packs. The total protein content remaining in the gel is detected with the Stain-Free detection, using the same exposure parameters as used with the gels before the transfer for reliable comparison. The content of protein was also detected with the Stain-Free detection on the membrane. Even if most of the proteins are transferred in 7 min, the gradient gel contains less HMW proteins than the homogeneous gel after the transfer.

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