Posts Tagged ‘tools’

Novel technique reveals both gene number and protein expression simultaneously

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 09-22-2011

Researchers have discovered a method for simultaneously visualizing gene number and protein expression in individual cells. The fluorescence microscopy technique could permit a detailed analysis of the relationship between gene status and expression of the corresponding protein in cells and tissues, and bring a clearer understanding of cancer and other complex diseases, according to researchers who led the study.

The new technique is called the fluorescent in situ gene protein assay. It combines traditional fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with the in situ proximity ligation assay, which is capable of resolving individual protein molecules.

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A Practical Approach to Assay Design for qPCR

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 09-02-2011

Designing good qPCR assays can be fun! Learn how to overcome difficult assays, designs and optimization while conforming to the MIQE guidelines.

How many reference genes do you use in qPCR?

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 08-10-2011

In the past, we’ve discussed the importance of selecting appropriate reference genes for your qPCR experiment (also see point 7 of the MIQE guideline checklist). This means that it is important to select genes that do NOT exhibit any changes in expression under the treatment conditions you are studying. This is easier said than done!

“Once upon a time” everyone used either beta actin, 18s, or gapdh as reference genes. Their expression never changes, right? Wrong! So which genes should you choose? If you try to figure it out using previous papers, how do you know that they’ve chosen the correct genes? If you run a few genes side-by-side and try to compare their expression both under treatment and control, which one should you set as the baseline and which one can you say is for sure moving (it’s all relative isn’t it)?

One of my twitter friends told me that she uses six reference genes in her qPCR experiments. I used to use two. That got me thinking…how many reference genes does the “average” lab use? Please help satisfy my curiosity by participating in the poll below!

How many reference genes are you using in your qPCR experiment?

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There is still hope for stem cell research

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 08-07-2011

Stem cell scientists, do not despair! Despite concerns over iPSC-derived teratomas and altered genomic and epigenomic states, researchers at UC Davis have written a roadmap for finding solutions to the problems identified with iPSCs which has been published last week in the journal Cell.

According to Paul S. Knoepfler, UC Davis associate professor of cell biology and human anatomy:

iPSCs offer the potential to treat many diseases as an alternative or adjuvant therapy to drugs or surgery. Problems that have been identified with their use likely can be overcome, allowing iPSCs to jump from the laboratory dish to patients who could benefit from them.

To read more click here.

7 Great Resources for HRM Analysis

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 08-04-2011

Bio-Rad Laboratories recently launched the Precision Melt Supermix, which is a high-perfomance supermix for both genotyping and epigenetic analyses.

In honor of this launch, we invite you to review some of the resources (including technical notes, review articles and video tutorials) that we have posted on high resolution melt analysis. Feel free to to click on any of the links below for further details: