Posts Tagged ‘PrimePCR’

Bio-Rad Offers New PrimePCR™ Disease Panels for Real-Time PCR

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 12-18-2013

Bio-Rad Laboratories announced the launch of more than 700 new PrimePCR human and mouse disease panels and 71 new pathway panels for real-time PCR (qPCR). The panels allow researchers to thoroughly and efficiently investigate genes known to be differentially expressed in a specified pathology or biological pathway. Bio-Rad now offers more than 1,100 panels with nearly 6,700 predesigned plate configurations, establishing Bio-Rad as the industry’s largest and most up-to-date provider of predesigned plates.

The expanded product line includes highly studied pathways such as Hedgehog and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, as well as processes such as circadian rhythms and visual perception. In addition, disease categories span hundreds of conditions, ranging from specific cancers and neoplasms to metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes.

Working in collaboration with Thomson Reuters, Bio-Rad developed a plate design strategy that ensures that the most relevant gene targets are chosen for each real-time PCR panel; gene targets are weighted for differentially expressed genes and the frequency with which they appear in the peer-reviewed literature. For disease panels, Thomson Reuters referenced the diseases and their corresponding gene targets in the U.S. National Library of Medicine database.

All of the assays were designed strictly adhering to MIQE guidelines: maximum transcript coverage, minimal overlap with known single nucleotide polymorphisms, and spanning large introns where possible. In addition, all of the primer assays have been fully wet-lab validated for specificity, efficiency, and sensitivity to an unprecedented level of quality, according to Jan Hellemans, cofounder of the qPCR and bioinformatics firm Biogazelle, which worked with Bio-Rad to develop these assays.

Bio-Rad has also updated and expanded its existing predesigned pathway and collection panels to include the most scientifically relevant gene targets based on current literature and the latest bioinformatics data.

For more information on Bio-Rad’s PrimePCR products, please visit www.bio-rad.com/PrimePCR.

New PrimePCR™ Probe Assays for Human and Mouse Genomes

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 07-02-2013

Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. today announced the launch of its PrimePCR probe assays for quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The new assays for human and mouse genomes set the bar for specificity, sensitivity, and linear dynamic range.

PrimePCRBio-Rad has again partnered with Biogazelle, a qPCR data analysis and services company, to design probe assays for qPCR gene expression analysis. The fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes were designed to complement Bio-Rad’s high-specificity PCR primer assays, enabling multiplex assays and eliminating the need for melt curve analysis.

The primer pair of each probe assay has been wet-lab validated following strict assay performance standards for amplification efficiency, specificity, sensitivity, and linear dynamic range. These specifications help researchers meet the MIQE (minimum information for publication of quantitative real-time PCR experiments) guidelines.

The new probe assays are validated for use with iScript™ advanced cDNA synthesis kit for RT-qPCR and SsoAdvanced™ universal probes supermix for superior performance.

The assays are available with probes labeled with FAM, HEX, or TEX 615 fluorophores, and each includes a gene-specific synthetic qPCR template designed as a positive control. The probe assays can be used with CFX real-time PCR detection systems and data analysis software, streamlining PCR data collection and analysis.

PrimePCR probe assays are available in 500, 1,000, and 2,500 reaction sizes.

For more information on Bio-Rad’s PrimePCR products, please visit www.bio-rad.com/PrimePCR.

Pathway Curation and Real-Time PCR Panel Design Strategy

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 11-20-2012

Pathway analysis provides an efficient and focused approach for studying a large number of related gene targets in a single experiment. The pathway curation and ranking strategy employed by Thomson Reuters and Bio-Rad ensures that the gene assays present on each real-time PCR pathway and collection panel are the most relevant for gene expression profiling based on differential expression studies and the frequency with which gene targets appear in the peer-reviewed literature. All PrimePCR assays were designed following strict guidelines on maximum transcript coverage, have minimal overlap with known single nucleotide polymorphisms, and span large introns where possible. In addition, they have all been fully validated in the lab, passing stringent quality controls. As a result, PrimePCR panels set a new quality standard for commercially available predesigned qPCR pathway panels.

Click here to read the full article in Bioradiations.

Click on the pathway map below to view a larger version.

Apoptosis and survival — TNF-R1 signaling pathway map. This pathway map is one example of the 260 canonical pathway maps provided by Thomson Reuters. Pathway maps illustrate protein interactions and regulation to provide a comprehensive picture of signaling and disease processes. On the Bio-Rad website, each target on the map can be selected to view corresponding gene and protein information.

Bio-Rad Becomes Only Vendor With Complete Line of Validated qPCR Assays

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 09-04-2012

Well…you heard it here first folks. Last week we told you about Bio-Rad Laboratories new line of pre-validated, MIQE friendly qPCR assays and how this is bound to save researchers troubleshooting time and frustration (see MIQE Trouble-Free). Now the story has made the news. According to the story on GenomeWeb, Bio-Rad’s launch of PrimePCR has given the company the distinct advantage of being the only vendor whose entire portfolio of qPCR assays has been validated to such standards. The company expects the assays, which cover approximately 95 percent of the human transcriptome, to save researchers time and resources by obviating the need to validate assays in their own laboratories.

Click here to read the rest of the story (subscription required).