Posts Tagged ‘molecular biology’

Looking for something to rock your central dogma? How about RNA, DNA…TNA?

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 01-09-2012

When I first read this I thought that it was simply written by a mistaken undergrad student. Alas, it is not!

In the chemistry of the living world, a pair of nucleic acids—DNA and RNA—reign supreme. As carrier molecules of the genetic code, they provide all organisms with a mechanism for faithfully reproducing themselves as well as generating the myriad proteins vital to living systems.

Yet according to John Chaput, a researcher at the Center for Evolutionary Medicine and Informatics, at Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute®, it may not always have been so.

Click here to read the whole story.

Below is a PBS video of Dr. Chaput’s research from several years ago:

Imagine where genomic technology can take us

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 01-04-2012

Inspiring words from NIH director Francis Collins.

Contest: Silliest lab video of 2011

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 12-13-2011

Nate “the great” Krefman of Bad Habits and Stickleback fame has once again outdone himself with a stellar lab video performance. Now, I have to admit that what you are about to see is some of the silliest and dorkiest filmography that I have ever watched but it is always a blast watching a highly educated molecular biologist have fun in the lab.

My challenge to you, my dear readers, is to send me the dorkiest and silliest lab videos you have seen on the web (or performed yourself…anonymity will be honored where requested). Once all submissions are in we will hold a vote to see who can be named the dorkiest molecular biologist of the year!

Submissions can be sent either by commenting on this post or by emailing avi (at) americanbiotechnolgist (dot) com.

To glycolisize or oxidative phosphorylize, that is the stem cell question

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 11-16-2011

Human pluripotent stem cells, which can develop into any cell type in the body, rely heavily on glycolysis, or sugar fermentation, to drive their metabolic activities.

In contrast, mature cells in children and adults depend more on cell mitochondria to convert sugar and oxygen into carbon dioxide and water during a high energy-producing process called oxidative phosphorylation for their metabolic needs.

How cells progress from one form of energy production to another during development is unknown, although a finding by UCLA stem cell researchers provides new insight for this transition that may have implications for using these cells for therapies in the clinic.
Read the rest of this entry »

Why you should NEVER throw out research samples. Even if they are 40,000 years old!

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 09-19-2011

Despite being extinct for 10,000 years, the wooly mammoth is still proving useful to medical research scientists. In fact, it has been proposed that wooly mammoth hemoglobin protein, may form the basis of future blood replacement products. However, one of the biggest challenges facing scientists was to produce protein from DNA samples that were over 25,000 years old.

To read more on this fascinating story click here .