Posts Tagged ‘molecular biology’

Complex Diseases Traced to Gene Copy Numbers

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 10-17-2013

Duke researchers have connected very rare and precise duplications and deletions in the human genome to their complex disease consequences by duplicating them in zebrafish.

The findings are based on detailed studies of five people missing a small fragment of their genome and suffering from a mysterious syndrome of craniofacial features, visual anomalies and developmental delays.

When those patient observations were coupled to analyses of the anatomical defects in genetically altered zebrafish embryos, the researchers were able to identify the contribution specific genes made to the pathology, demonstrating a powerful tool that can now be applied to unraveling many other complex and rare human genetic conditions.

The findings are broadly important for human genetic disorders because copy-number variants (CNVs) — fragments of the genome that are either missing or existing in extra copies — are quite common in the genome. But their precise contribution to diseases has been difficult to determine because CNVs can affect the function of many genes simultaneously.

Read more…

The Mitosis Dance

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 09-09-2013

The following video is an attempt by Baylor University students to explain Mitosis through dance. How well do you think they conveyed their message?

Extracting and Purifying Human DNA in Under Three Minutes

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 05-07-2013

University of Washington engineers and NanoFacture, a Bellevue, Wash., company, have created a device that can extract human DNA from fluid samples in a simpler, more efficient and environmentally friendly way than conventional methods.

Conventional methods use a centrifuge to spin and separate DNA molecules or strain them from a fluid sample with a micro-filter, but these processes take 20 to 30 minutes to complete and can require excessive toxic chemicals.

UW engineers designed microscopic probes that dip into a fluid sample – saliva, sputum or blood – and apply an electric field within the liquid. That draws particles to concentrate around the surface of the tiny probe. Larger particles hit the tip and swerve away, but DNA-sized molecules stick to the probe and are trapped on the surface. It takes two or three minutes to separate and purify DNA using this technology.

Read the full story on the UW website.

James Watson: How we discovered DNA

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 11-29-2012

Very entertaining!

Why didn’t I think of that?

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 08-02-2012

It’s the little things in life that frustrate me the most. Like fumbling around with a fine tipped Sharpie trying to label a strip of 0.2ml PCR tubes. Now that’s frustrating. Then there are people that use their brains for finding creative solutions instead of just whining about the problem to their lab mates. Here is one such example. I wish I had thought of that!

What tips do you have for your fellow biotechnologists that can help save them both time and sanity?