Posts Tagged ‘medicine’

The Future of Medicine

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 11-21-2012

Besides demonstrating a really cool tool, this video has the best quote of the day:

You don’t want to hear “oops” in real surgery, but fortunately our digital man has undo

Musical Medicine

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 10-03-2012

Now THAT’S the way to use a cell phone

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 07-25-2012

In my opinion, there are waaayyy too many cell phones in schools these days. Ringing, texting, gaming…all of these are annoyances that disturb class and distract students’ attention. However, students at Johns Hopkins have redeemed themselves and renewed my confidence that undergrads can actually utilize cell phones responsibly.

Johns Hopkins biomedical engineering undergraduates have developed a noninvasive way to identify patients suffering from anemia hoping to save thousands of women and children from this dangerous blood disorder in developing nations. The device, HemoGlobe, is designed to convert the existing cell phones of health workers into a “prick-free” system for detecting and reporting anemia at the community level.

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Lighting up the operating room

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 04-23-2012

Taking the “color by number” concept to a whole new level!

A genetic breakthrough for cleft lip

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 11-29-2011

Scientists at Weill Cornell Medical College used genetic methods to successfully repair cleft lips in mice embryos specially engineered for the study of cleft lip and cleft palate. The research breakthrough may show the way to prevent or treat the conditions in humans.

Cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common birth defects, with treatment requiring multiple cycles of surgery, speech therapy and orthodontics. To date, there have been very few pre-clinical methods that allow researchers to study the molecular causes of these malformations. In particular, there has been a lack of animal models that accurately reflect the contribution of multiple genes to these congenital deformities in humans.
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