Posts Tagged ‘genetics’

Glowing kittens, transgenics and FIV: A step towards combating HIV

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 09-15-2011

What do humans and cats have in common? Apart from a liking for tuna and a tendency to get sleepy on a Sunday afternoon, both are AIDS-susceptible species, and researchers in the USA and Japan are looking at feline genome manipulation as a route to create better models for HIV and other infectious and non-infectious diseases.

Researchers from the Mayo Clinic used gamete-targeted lentiviral transgenesis to transfect the feline egg cells with a gene for the restriction factor, TRIMCyp, along with a jellyfish gene as a fluorescent reporter gene to track the efficacy of transfection, before fertilisation in vitro. This was the first success of this technique in a carnivore.

Read the rest of this entry »

A Practical Approach to Assay Design for qPCR

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 09-02-2011

Designing good qPCR assays can be fun! Learn how to overcome difficult assays, designs and optimization while conforming to the MIQE guidelines.

The bacterial industrial revolution

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 08-31-2011

George Church, the talented genetic professor, has made headlines once again. We are very fond of George Church and have written about him and his work several times in the past (see: George Church: The Father of Personalized Genomics, New tools for rewriting the code of life and A Scientific Legend’s Approach to Solving Problems and Developing Technologies).

The latest article, appearing in The Boston Globe, talks about Dr. Church’s approach to synthetic biology and his “broad brush” approach of editing bacterial genomes to devise powerful new technologies.

To read more click here. H/T to Genomeweb for the find.

The rapid evolution of Neanderthal research

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 08-30-2011

A recent study published in Science has shown that potential interbreeding between Neanderthals, Denisovans and Modern Humans may have helped boost modern man’s immune system. Many reviews have already been published on this subject (see Science 2.0 for a good review or the ScienceDaily news release) and so we won’t dwell on the subject in this post. However, in light of these findings we would like to share with you a YouTube interview with Svante Pääbo, a Neanderthal researcher, produced by The DNA Learning Center in 2009.

It’s interesting to see how far we’ve come in just 2 short years!

Explaining Cancer Through Narrated Cartoons

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 08-16-2011

The New York Times has a great cartoon video explaining three predominant theories of how cancer progresses from a single cell into a metastatic tumor. The narrated video discusses:

  1. The microbe theory-whereby an otherwise symbiotic relationship between bacteria and their host is spoiled by miscommunication
  2. The Junk DNA theory
  3. The MicroRNA theory-whereby microRNA either prevents mRNA from reaching the ribosome or intercepts and changes the mRNA message

Click on the picture below to see the video on the NYT website.