Posts Tagged ‘cancer research’

New Molecular Tool for Prognosis and Treatment of Brain Tumors

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 01-17-2012

In a paper recently published in BMC Medical Genomics, scientists from Sandra L Rodriguez-Zas’ lab at the University of Illinois have identified a cohort of biomarkers that help predict survivability of patients who are afflicted with the aggressive malignant Glioblastoma multiforme brain tumor. The study also found that survivability varies between different genetic profiles and that factors such as race, gender and therapy may have a significant impact upon the survival and quality of life of individuals afflicted by glioblastoma multiforme.
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Proteomics: The Next Frontier in Cancer Research

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 12-15-2011

Now that we’ve finished our series on Proteomics Application Tips, it’s time to reward ourselves with a captivating talk by Professor Danny Hillis on Understanding Cancer Through Proteomics. Yes…he’s preaching to the choir, but it’s still fun to see our cause promoted on the “big screen.” Enjoy!

Worm sperm and other creepy crawlers

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 10-19-2011

worm sperm magnified 5,000x

For better and for worse, human health depends on a cell’s motility –– the ability to crawl from place to place. In every human body, millions of cells –are crawling around doing mostly good deeds ––– though if any of those crawlers are cancerous, watch out.

“This is not some horrible sci-fi movie come true but, instead, normal cells carrying out their daily duties,” said Florida State University cell biologist Tom Roberts. For 35 years he has studied the mechanical and molecular means by which amorphous single cells purposefully propel themselves throughout the body in amoeboid-like fashion ––absent muscles, bones or brains.

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Older cancer survivor population to increase substantially

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 10-06-2011

Over the next decade, the population of cancer survivors over 65 years of age will increase by approximately 42 percent.

“We can expect a dramatic increase in the number of older adults who are diagnosed with or carry a history of cancer,” said Julia Rowland, Ph.D., director of the Office of Cancer Survivorship in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). “Cancer is largely a disease of aging, so we’re seeing yet another effect of the baby boom generation and we need to prepare for this increase.”

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Novel technique reveals both gene number and protein expression simultaneously

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 09-22-2011

Researchers have discovered a method for simultaneously visualizing gene number and protein expression in individual cells. The fluorescence microscopy technique could permit a detailed analysis of the relationship between gene status and expression of the corresponding protein in cells and tissues, and bring a clearer understanding of cancer and other complex diseases, according to researchers who led the study.

The new technique is called the fluorescent in situ gene protein assay. It combines traditional fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with the in situ proximity ligation assay, which is capable of resolving individual protein molecules.

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