Posts Tagged ‘biotechnology’

Proteomics: The Next Frontier in Cancer Research

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 12-15-2011

Now that we’ve finished our series on Proteomics Application Tips, it’s time to reward ourselves with a captivating talk by Professor Danny Hillis on Understanding Cancer Through Proteomics. Yes…he’s preaching to the choir, but it’s still fun to see our cause promoted on the “big screen.” Enjoy!

Contest: Silliest lab video of 2011

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 12-13-2011

Nate “the great” Krefman of Bad Habits and Stickleback fame has once again outdone himself with a stellar lab video performance. Now, I have to admit that what you are about to see is some of the silliest and dorkiest filmography that I have ever watched but it is always a blast watching a highly educated molecular biologist have fun in the lab.

My challenge to you, my dear readers, is to send me the dorkiest and silliest lab videos you have seen on the web (or performed yourself…anonymity will be honored where requested). Once all submissions are in we will hold a vote to see who can be named the dorkiest molecular biologist of the year!

Submissions can be sent either by commenting on this post or by emailing avi (at) americanbiotechnolgist (dot) com.

How bureaucracy is killing innovative medical research

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 12-12-2011

The promise of stem cell research for drug discovery and cell-based therapies depends on the ability of scientists to acquire stem cell lines for their research.

A survey of more than 200 human embryonic stem cell researchers in the United States found that nearly four in ten researchers have faced excessive delay in acquiring a human embryonic stem cell line and that more than one-quarter were unable to acquire a line they wanted to study.

“The survey results provide empirical data to support previously anecdotal concerns that delays in acquiring or an inability to acquire certain human embryonic stem cell lines may be hindering stem cell science in the United States,” said Aaron Levine, an assistant professor in the School of Public Policy in the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Results of the survey were published in the December issue of the journal Nature Biotechnology. Funding for the study was provided by the Kauffman Foundation’s Roadmap for an Entrepreneurial Economy Program.
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Pictorial encouragment for our beloved Ph.Ds

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 11-30-2011

You are almost finished your Ph.D. and you are feeling on top of the world. You’ve spent countless hours, days, weeks and years engaged in your research and you are hoping that all of that effort has contributed positively towards other research in your field. Here is a great pictorial to help keep things in perspective. Your career has only just begun! Remember to keep pushing!

Thank to Matt Might for The Illustrated Guide to a Ph.D.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.

A genetic breakthrough for cleft lip

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 11-29-2011

Scientists at Weill Cornell Medical College used genetic methods to successfully repair cleft lips in mice embryos specially engineered for the study of cleft lip and cleft palate. The research breakthrough may show the way to prevent or treat the conditions in humans.

Cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common birth defects, with treatment requiring multiple cycles of surgery, speech therapy and orthodontics. To date, there have been very few pre-clinical methods that allow researchers to study the molecular causes of these malformations. In particular, there has been a lack of animal models that accurately reflect the contribution of multiple genes to these congenital deformities in humans.
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