New Discovery in Living Cell Signaling

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 07-04-2014

A breakthrough discovery into how living cells process and respond to chemical information could help advance the development of treatments for a large number of cancers and other cellular disorders that have been resistant to therapy. An international collaboration of researchers, led by scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley, have unlocked the secret behind the activation of the Ras family of proteins, one of the most important components of cellular signaling networks in biology and major drivers of cancers that are among the most difficult to treat.

Read more…

Yesterday-Science Was Such and Easy Game to Play!

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 07-02-2014

Stunning Scientific “Art” Exhibit

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 07-01-2014

Skin cancer cells Markus Schober and Elaine Fuchs, The Rockefeller University, New York, N.Y.

Skin cancer cells
Markus Schober and Elaine Fuchs, The Rockefeller University, New York, N.Y.

Stunning scientific images of blood, brain, bacteria, viruses and more, enlarged by as much as 50,000 times, are on display in an exhibit called Life: Magnified, on view through November 2014 at Washington Dulles International Airport’s Gateway Gallery. The gallery, en route to Concourse C, is in a two-level walkway through which about 2.5 million passengers pass each year.

The display is cosponsored by the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) and the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority’s Arts Program. The program uses the arts to enhance travel experiences at Dulles International and Reagan National Airports.

“These images show science that shines like art. Many of these stunning pictures were created by researchers who work at or are funded by NIH, as part of their quest to better understand basic life processes and gain insights about health and disease,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D.

“We hope this exhibit helps inform the public about cutting-edge biomedical research and how visualizing biology, with all its complexity and beauty, can lead to important, medically relevant advances,” said NIGMS Director Jon R. Lorsch, Ph.D.

“Many of the images come from organisms like mice, fruit flies and zebrafish. These organisms have much in common with us, including a large proportion of their genes, the way their tissues and organs develop, and how their bodies function. Studying them speeds scientific progress to learn more about our own biology,” Lorsch added.

The 46 colorful backlit enlargements in the exhibit were selected from more than 600 submitted by researchers. In addition to the variety of organisms, the collection features a wide range of cell types and imaging techniques.

“The Gateway Gallery has traditionally welcomed passengers to Dulles International through its unique and engaging art displays,” said Christopher U. Browne, Washington Dulles International Airport manager. “This exhibit will add to the enjoyment of the airport experience while offering travelers an intriguing, up-close view of life on a microscopic level.”

“This eye-popping show lets visitors take a dazzling trip through the cellular world, which is both foreign and as close as their own skin,” said ASCB Executive Director Stefano Bertuzzi.

Although only passengers who pass through airport security can see the exhibit itself, an online gallery is available at http://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/life-magnified/pages/default.aspx. This site includes high-resolution versions of all of the images in the collection, along with longer captions than in the airport exhibit. All of the images are freely downloadable for non-commercial purposes.

Cell Isolation – The Two Worlds of Cell Separation

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 06-30-2014

Get a Free Sample of TGX Stain-Free™ FastCast™ Acrylamide Solutions

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 06-26-2014

If you hand cast your own gels, TGX Stain-Free FastCast acrylamide solutions will give you a fresh perspective. Request a free sample and experience how these innovative solutions increase the efficiency of your 1-D electrophoresis or western blotting experiments. It truly is happiness in a bottle.

Faster Performance

  • Achieve electrophoretic run times as short as 20 minutes
  • Enjoy protein transfers in as little as 3 minutes using the TransBlot® Turbo™ transfer system

Stain-Free Visualization*

  • Monitor the success of electrophoresis and transfer steps without additional staining
  • Visualize proteins in your gel or blot in less than 5 minutes with Bio-Rad’s stain-free enabled imaging systems

Longer Shelf Life

  • Gels last up to 1 month at 4°C after casting
  • Shelf life of acrylamide solutions is 1 year at room temperature
CLICK TO EXPAND

CLICK TO EXPAND

* The Quick Start Guide to Stain-Free Imaging provides step-by-step instructions on how to obtain stain-free images from TGX Stain-Free gels. If you do not have access to a Bio-Rad stain-free enabled imager, your gels can be stained using traditional staining methods.