A Biologist’s Poem In Honor Of St. Patrick’s Day

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 03-17-2014

Brewers make wort but Yeast create beer!

A Simple Way to Label Your Own Antibodies

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 03-13-2014

Bio-Rad Laboratories announced the launch of its ReadiLink antibody labeling kits, one of the market’s simplest antibody conjugation solution for labeling microscale amounts (50–100 µg) of antibody. These kits are ideal for researchers interested in labeling their own antibodies for flow cytometry and cell sorting applications.

Using the ReadiLink antibody labeling kits, researchers can label their antibodies in two easy steps. The protocol takes only 70 minutes, and the labels are as bright and photostable as traditional dyes. Bio-Rad offers 10 different fluorophores whose excitation/emission wavelengths range from UV to infrared.

ReadiLink antibody labeling kits permit fluorophore conjugation of antibodies in two simple steps.

“The labeling kits will benefit a wide range of researchers,” said Mary Ferrero, Bio-Rad Product Manager in the Gene Expression Division, Life Sciences Group. “ReadiLink antibody labeling kits are ideal for researchers who are using a rare antibody, are interested in an antibody that is not commercially available with the appropriate fluorophore, or who want to label an antibody with a fluorophore that will fit into their multicolor flow cytometric experiment.”

Bio-Rad also offers additional reagents and consumables for each step of flow cytometry experiments, such as the ReadiDrop™ cell viability assays and primary antibodies.

For more information about Bio-Rad’s antibody labeling kits, please visit www.bio-rad.com/antibodylabeling.

Why American Patriots Need to Support Science

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 03-12-2014

Eloquently said by The Science Guy.

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The Next Revolution In PCR

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 03-11-2014

Clearly digital PCR has come a long way in recent years, thanks in large measure to the development of commercial systems like the QX200. These technology advances seem to indicate a tipping point where a greater number of researchers will soon have access to the technology, which will spur development of new applications that take advantage of the full capabilities of digital PCR and move scientists towards more robust biomarker studies and even single cell analyses.

Could the next revolution in PCR be digital? In an article appearing in Biotechniques, Nathan Blow takes a look at the history of digital PCR and why the methodology might have finally reached a tipping point in development.

Read the article to find out:

  • What makes digital PCR different from traditional PCR
  • A short history of digital PCR
  • Why did it take so long for the technology to catch on with developers and researchers?
  • How does digital PCR compare to real-time-quantitative PCR?

To learn more read Digital PCR: Separating from the Pack.

The DNA Vending Machine

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 03-10-2014

This is one of the strangest convergences of science and art that I have ever witnessed. Now for the big question: Would you ever purchase someone else’s DNA for the sake of art?