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Enter to Win Electrophoresis for a Year!

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 10-17-2011

You could win the Grand Prize! Simply complete the online form and you will be automatically entered into a prize draw to win a package of electrophoresis equipment and reagents for a complete year’s electrophoresis!

What Do I Win?
Imagine winning the whole suite of products needed for electrophoresis?

  • Grand Prize: ChemiDoc™ MP imaging system, 4 Immunstar™ Western C™ Chemiluminescent kits, Trans-Blot Turbo® system, 300 transfer packs, and 2 packages of the 5-pack Precision Plus Protein™ Dual Color Standards, Mini-PROTEAN® Tetra Cell and 300 Mini-PROTEAN TGX™ Stain-Free gels, Laemmli Sample Buffer and Running Buffer, PowerPac Basic™ Power Supply (100–120/220–240 V)
  • Second Place Prize: (3 sets) 1 Trans-Blot Turbo system, 300 Trans-Blot Turbo transfer packs and protein standards; 1 Mini-PROTEAN Tetra Cell and 300 Mini-PROTEAN TGX gels, Laemmli sample buffer, 2 packages of 5-Pack Precision Plus Protein Dual Color Standards, and 4 Immun-Star WesternC Chemiluminescent Kits
  • Third Place Prize: 50 Mini-PROTEAN TGX shirts

Prizes announced on February 1, 2012. Click here for details.

Win $1000 for your brainy film

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 05-04-2011

In honor of Brain Awareness Week, the Society for Neuroscience has launched a new contest challenging entrants to make a video that is up to five minutes long, demonstrating a concept about the brain that could be used as a teaching tool or resource.

Prizes include:

  • $1,000 Cash Prize, complimentary registration to Neuroscience 2011, two nights’ complimentary hotel, and economy air travel
  • $500 Cash
  • $250 Cash

For information on how to enter and eligibility see the brain awareness contest website.

Hat tip to grrlscientist for this great find!

Vote for Life Science Product of the Year and Win a Samsung Notebook

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 03-10-2011

You have until March 22 to vote for your favorite life science product of the year (2010) and be entered in a draw to win a Samsung N210 Netbook from SelectScience.net.

The Gel Doc EZ™ system from Bio-Rad Laboratories was previously ranked by The Scientist as one of the “Top 10 Innovations of 2010” and has now been nominated by SelectScience members to enter the final voting stage for the Scientist’s Choice Award for Best Life Science Product, 2010.

We encourage you to vote for your favorite product by visiting the Scientist’s Choice Awards voting form. Please note that that in order to vote you must be a current working scientist, and may only vote once (duplicate votes will be disqualified).

Below is a description of the Gel Doc EZ system some of the reasons why it was nominated for the product of the year award.

The Gel Doc EZ system provides publication-quality images and analysis in seconds — with just the push of a button. The automated push-button functionality eliminates the need for researchers to manually manipulate filters, lenses, or lighting.

The imager allows the use of multiple application-specific trays, including a UV tray for imaging fluorescent stains such as ethidium bromide, a white tray for imaging colorimetric stains such as Coomassie blue, and a blue tray for imaging green fluorescent dyes.

The Gel Doc EZ imager is also the only gel documentation system capable of imaging stain-free gels. When researchers use the stain-free tray for imaging proteins separated by electrophoresis on Bio-Rad’s Criterion® TGX Stain-Free™ precast gels, staining protocols shrink from hours down to a five-minute activation and imaging process.

“Many labs stain gels with Coomassie Blue on a daily basis as part of their protein analysis experimental workflow,” said Brad Crutchfield, Vice President and Life Science Group Manager of Bio-Rad. “Imagine a technology that saves them hours every time they need to stain and image a protein gel. First, researchers can digitally image and analyze their samples with the same ease as a point-and-shoot consumer camera. Second, by using the stain-free feature, researchers can shave staining protocols from hours to five minutes.”

The key ingredient is a tri-halo compound incorporated into the Criterion TGX Stain-Free gels. After electrophoresis, the gel is subjected to UV irradiation in the Gel Doc EZ imager to activate a covalent reaction between the tri-halo compound and tryptophan residues. The resultant tryptophan adduct, which is fluorescent when excited by the same UV source, is then automatically imaged.

Anyone interested in rapid protein visualization in polyacrylamide gels (no staining, destaining or fiddling with imaging system settings necessary), should also see our previous post on A Revolutionary Tool for 5 Minute Protein Visualization and Analysis

Gel Doc™ EZ Imager Ranked Among “Top 10 Innovations” of 2010

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 12-02-2010

The Gel Doc EZ imager from Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. was ranked by The Scientist as among the “Top 10 Innovations of 2010″ out of more than 60 entries reviewed.

According to The Scientist, “This year’s winners include essential tools, such as sequencers, imagers, and cell counters, which have the potential to simplify and streamline work in biology labs.”

The Gel Doc EZ system provides publication-quality images and analysis in seconds — with just the push of a button. The automated push-button functionality eliminates the need for researchers to manually manipulate filters, lenses, or lighting.

“I really value the Gel Doc EZ imager’s ease-of-use and speed as it gives our lab the ability to really speed up and do more science during the day,” said Dr Sriram Kosuri, Sc.D., a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. “In addition, the system gives us publication-quality gels, so there isn’t a sacrifice in quality or accuracy.”

The imager allows the use of multiple application-specific trays, including a UV tray for imaging fluorescent stains such as ethidium bromide, a white tray for imaging colorimetric stains such as Coomassie blue, and a blue tray for imaging green fluorescent dyes.

Stain-free technology shaves protein detection time down from hours to minutes
The Gel Doc EZ imager is the only gel documentation system capable of imaging stain-free gels. When researchers use the stain-free tray for imaging proteins separated by electrophoresis on Bio-Rad’s Criterion® TGX Stain-Free™ precast gels, staining protocols shrink from hours down to a five-minute activation and imaging process.

“Many labs stain gels with Coomassie Blue on a daily basis as part of their protein analysis experimental workflow,” said Brad Crutchfield, Vice President and Life Science Group Manager of Bio-Rad. “Imagine a technology that saves them hours every time they need to stain and image a protein gel. First, researchers can digitally image and analyze their samples with the same ease as a point-and-shoot consumer camera. Second, by using the stain-free feature, researchers can shave staining protocols from hours to five minutes.”

The key ingredient is a tri-halo compound incorporated into the Criterion TGX Stain-Free gels. After electrophoresis, the gel is subjected to UV irradiation in the Gel Doc EZ imager to activate a covalent reaction between the tri-halo compound and tryptophan residues. The resultant tryptophan adduct, which is fluorescent when excited by the same UV source, is then automatically imaged.

The list of The Scientist Top 10 Innovations of 2010 can be read at www.the-scientist.com/top10innovations. A video and detailed information about the Gel Doc EZ imager are available at www.bio-rad.com/top10innovations.

About the “Top 10 Innovations” List from The Scientist
The Scientist, a leading scientific magazine covering the life sciences, appointed an expert panel of judges who, in pushing technical boundaries, have collectively published more than 600 academic papers. This is the second annual ranking of life science innovations.

source: Bio-Rad Laboratories press release

Igem competition enters its final day at MIT

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 11-06-2010

The International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition is back for the 8th year and entering its final day on Monday November 8th. The competition involves teams of undergraduate students from various universities who are given a kit of biological parts at the beginning of the summer which are used to build biological systems and operate them in living cells. This year’s competition taking place at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is the largest yet boasting 130 teams and 2,000 participants.

The competition encourages both intellectual exercise and interpersonal skills. According to the iGEM judging criteria, requirements for earning a gold medal include:
- building biological systems and operate them in living cells
- helping another iGEM team
- Developing and documenting a new technical standard
- Outlining and detailing a new approach to an issue of Human Practice in synthetic biology

For more information on iGEM, visit the iGEM 2010 website

iGEM is an international event and has attracted contestants from all across the globe. Watch the video below to see news coverage of the Dutch team’s project on oil degradation using microorganisms as covered in the Dutch news (subtitles)

and an inspiring video from the 2010 U of Illinois team

or the Harvard iGEM recruitment video

Which is your favorite?