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Archive for the ‘Career’ Category

Who in the world is Harold Varmus?

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 08-27-2013

Harold Varmus is the 1989 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for discovery of the cellular origin of retroviral oncogenes. Check out a tribute to Dr. Varmus below.

What are two high school students from Tennessee doing that makes every scientist jealous?

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 08-27-2013

Two high school students from Tennessee have accomplished what many 4th year graduate students are still dreaming of doing…publishing their results in a top scientific journal.

Dalton Chaffee and Hayes Griffin worked with mentor R. Tucker Gilman, a former postdoctoral research fellow at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, to study mate choice.

Their work was published this week in the journal Evolution.

The students began their research between their junior and senior years at Bearden High School in Knoxville. They wanted to know why individuals choose the mates they choose.

Read more about these talented young students…

Hip Hoppin in the Science Classroom

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 08-22-2013

A very unique way to teach science.

How Scientific Sharing Equals Scientific Caring

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 08-05-2013

Over the past few weeks, we have explored the question of what constitutes scientific success and several important “comandments” for achieving this holy grail. In this post, we will discuss a presentation given by a young scientist at Delft University of Technology, who has expressed frustration with the common use of publication rate for defining scientific achievement. The presentation is especially noteworthy as it comes from a young scientist, Guenevere Prawiroatmodjo, who has yet to been tainted by years of politicking to climb the academic ladder. Nonetheless she is clearly bothered by the importance that is attached to an end-result that doesn’t pay tribute to, or encourage sharing of the entire scientific process. Not just results.

As Dr. Richard Feynmen so eloquently stated:

There isn’t any place to publish what you actually did in order to get to do the work

Richard Feynman

So what is Dr. Prawiroatmodjo’s solution to this problem? To create more openness and to share more parts of the scientific process. Furthermore, she postulates that it is critical to stimulate scientific motivation by encouraging entrepreneurship and commercialization.

In this vein, Dr. Prawiroatmodjo has come up with the “p” index which ranks scientific success as the number of times a scientist’s techniques or scientific tools have been used by the scientific community. In other words, if the “h” index ranks scientists by the number of citations their publication has received in the scientific literature, the “p” index ranks scientists by the impact their scientific methodology has had on the scientific community.

Ten commandments for becoming a successful scientist

 :: Posted by American Biotechnologist on 07-25-2013

In previous posts we covered 8 metrics to define scientific success and a full length video of Darren Griffin’s ten commandments for becoming a successful scientist. In the post below, we’ve written out these comandments for those readers who may not have 54 minutes to spare watching the full talk.

  1. There is only one way to do good research: get on with it!
  2. When opportunity knocks, open the door
  3. Build a team of people that are better than you are
  4. It’s not about your knowledge. It’s about your imagination, ideas and talented friends
  5. Always bring something to the party when collaborating (don’t forget it’s “give and take”)
  6. It’s not the size of your gun-it’s when you shoot. Timing is everything.
  7. If the systen doesn’t work for you-change it, do something else, or don’t complain! Nobody likes a winer
  8. Don’t ask why. Ask why not. How can you improve? Don’t take no for an answer right away when your grant or paper is rejected. Every no is one step closer to a yes! Learn how to turn rejection into an opportunity.
  9. The journey is often far more rewarding than the destination.
  10. Be nice to people! What goes around comes around.

What are your thoughts about Griffin’s commandments?